BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 17: (L-R) Travis Browne knocks out Alistair Overeem with a series of punches in their UFC heavyweight bout at TD Garden on August 17, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images)

The knockout, a fan favorite in any combat sport, is as beautiful as it is violent. While knockouts are clearly bad for the fighter on the receiving end, there may be strategic ramifications beyond what occurs to the brain that may impact fighters differently. In Knockout Ramifications: A Statistical View, Jason Burgos uses statistics rooted in case studies of Andre Arlovski and Alistair Overeem to explore the potential impact of knockouts on fighters’ strategic approach. In contrast to his statistical analysis, this article will seek to explore the ramification of knockouts through the perspective of an athlete/coach with almost 25 years of experience in combat sports.

Famed leadership guru James Maxwell is quoted as saying, “Change is inevitable.  Growth is Optional.” This seems apropos in a sport growing up in front of the eyes of the world. No major sports’ growth in history is as clearly documented as that of MMA given the explosion of media and technology over the last few decades. As such, fans and fighters have been witness to the evolution (or lack thereof) of styles and fighters as MMA rapidly evolved from a jujitsu dominated sport to one controlled by true mixed martial artists who apply dynamic skill-sets balanced in striking and grappling arts.

Famed leadership guru James Maxwell is quoted as saying, “Change is inevitable.  Growth is Optional.”

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